Telehealth: Is It A Fitness or Medical Wearable?

Our healthcare delivery is a rising concern in the United States as it affects everyone: our aging parents, your obese uncle or diabetic sister and even you.

Think about it — We are all aging with varying degrees of wellness. Some of our bodies age more gracefully than others, but as our bodies’ function declines our concern for mobility and living a life of continued independence become a priority. 80% of the elderly population have 2 or more chronic diseases and these are expensive yet treatable diseases that can be managed. Preventing the development of chronic conditions in the elderly could be the only way to improve life expectancy; perhaps new developments in the wearable sensor industry can address some of these issues by monitoring behaviors that might lead to diseases before health deteriorates.

Fortunately, with the rise of mobile technology, growing networks (Cloud platforms), and new computer technologies (Apps) we are seeing the mainstreaming of telemetry used as wearables today. The rise of smartphones with technologies such as 3G and 4G networks will further promote the adoption of mobile devices in most sectors, but with the most benefit, in the healthcare delivery system. The rise of telemedicine to monitor and manage chronic conditions can help reduce geographic barriers, cost of travel and time (from in-hospital to home consultations) and has the potential to offer seamless support and care to patients according to AlliedMarketResearch.

 

Infographic: Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. Adults Plan to Buy Wearable Tech  | Statista

According to Statista, 1 out of 5 adults in the U.S. plan to buy a wearable tech this year.

At CES 2014 last year, Scott Stein of CNET differentiated wearables into three categories: Notifiers, Trackers and Glasses.

We see many products which define the quantified-self movement — that which track our steps, monitor our heart rate and displays/share with our social networks — but what distinguishes a wearable as a medical device? This topic was this month’s discussion at the Activity Sensor & Personal Analytics Meet-Up held at Audience in Mountain View, CA. Gene Leybzon led the discussion and stated that medical wearables purpose is for diagnosis and treatment — and must pass a labyrinthine of regulatory and legal processes such as FDA and HIPAA. A fitness wearable does not have to pass the stringent regulatory tests and only needs to be informational and educational to the user. This user saturated market in fitness wearables (i.e. FitBit heart heart monitor, Nike FuelBand, Garmin & Polar speed tracker/pedometer, Spree body temperature tracker) may not be used for diagnostic purposes, but may be extremely helpful as it leads the path for medical wearables .

Proteus discussed the future release of an ingestible sensor that would integrate with medication allowing physicians to monitor compliance from a remote location. This is important for patients with diseases of the central nervous system (including multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s), heart failure and possibly organ transplant patients. This innovation would track sustained patient compliance and provide assurance that medications are being taken in a timely manner for presiding physicians or caregivers and family loved ones.

 

  We also looked at a product called AliveCor, a heart rate monitor that detects atrial fibrillation.

 
 

 

Video & Mobile Culture Is Here To Stay

As videos being post online has become a fast growing trend, Pew research states that the number of users who upload or post videos online has doubled in the past four years, “from 14% in 2009 to 31% today”. That means  video-sharing sites like Google’s YouTube have been the driving the popularity of online adults who download, upload and watch videos.

Videos on YouTube are helping celebrities such as Ellen DeGeneres  on how to select programming of her show.  DeGeneres and her producers at Warner Bros. have been mining the Internet to benefit popularity by social research. Not only does social media analytic help determine programming, but by quantifying  the popularity of viewership the television producers can glean who are their target (age/sex) audience  and monetize the next generation of Ellen fans using the advertising revenue with YouTube.  Seems that Ellen will  continue dancing for several more seasons by mining the numbers on all her social platforms.

Ellen Degeneres’ celebrity selfie took down Twitter with 3.3 billion impressions during the 86th Academy Awards.

As popularity of mobile continues to grow 23% of adults who post videos online do so using a mobile app such as Vine & Instagram.

The increasing popularity of social networking sites and the proliferation of cell phones have helped spur the growing online video culture.

Not surprising, the difference of age varies the content consumption;  yet of the the adult recording and creating video content themselves (18%) when posting their own videos online (58%), users most commonly share mundane things such as friends, family doing funny things (56%) and events they attend (54%). [Pew research, Oct 2013This would seem to suggest an excellent growth opportunity for those markets to utilize mobile and mobile apps for marketing events.

Case Study: Strategic Research & Development Proposal for EPA

Strategic Research & Business Practice

As the digital media revolution turns communication upside down, it also poses new challenges with how to strategically plan, propose, and assess the deployment of these new platforms. Our group client was the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). We designed a solution to engage the general public about the effects of climate change. The goal was to reach specific population segments to help understand and engage them in conversation about the effects of climate change in their neighborhood. We created a social media plan surrounding an app which was developed for this project.